From The New York Times: Indians have home-field advantage on recycling

 In a garage behind the stadium's left field, C.L. Gholston prepares bins of food scraps that will be fed into a grinder made by Quasar. (Photo by Michael F. McElroy for The New York Times)

In a garage behind the stadium’s left field, C.L. Gholston prepares bins of food scraps that will be fed into a grinder made by Quasar. (Photo by Michael F. McElroy for The New York Times)

The New York Times visited Progressive Field before Opening Day and got a first-hand look at how the Indians are at the forefront of recycling technology among big venues. An excerpt:

Well before the start of a Cleveland Indians game at Progressive Field, as players warmed up on the jewel-green field, it was business as usual in the garage behind left field for C.L. Gholston, a dishwasher.

He had wheeled down gray bins full of kitchen scraps — pineapple and melon rinds, carrot shavings and tomato ends — that were all part of the mix he fed into a contraption he calls the energy machine.

Built by InSinkErator, the garbage disposal maker, the machine grinds all types of food waste, including skin, fat, flesh and bone, into a slurry that is later transformed into energy and fertilizer at a plant operated by the renewable energy company Quasar.

As governments and industry seek to reduce emissions of methane — a more powerful heat-trapping gas than carbon dioxide — by limiting the amount of organic waste in landfills, large food processors are looking for new ways to get rid of their leftovers. Food waste, an estimated 34 million tons a year, according to the Environmental Protection Agency’s most recent figures, is the largest component of landfills, which are responsible for roughly 18 percent of the nation’s methane emissions.

Read the complete story by clicking here.

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